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IMAGE: The newly designed HAMR-Jr alongside its predecessor, HAMR-VI. HAMR-Jr is only slightly bigger in length and width than a penny, making it one of the smallest yet highly capable, high-speed… view more  Credit: (Image courtesy of Kaushik Jayaram/Harvard SEAS) This itsy-bitsy robot can’t climb up the waterspout yet but it can run, jump, carry heavy
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IMAGE: An SEM image of the device shows the irregular nanostructures created during the inverse design process. view more  Credit: (Image courtesy of Zhujun Shi/Harvard SEAS) Polarization, the direction in which light vibrates, is invisible to the human eye. Yet, so much of our optical world relies on the control and manipulation of this hidden quality
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UC Santa Barbara researchers continue to push the boundaries of LED design a little further with a new method that could pave the way toward more efficient and versatile LED display and lighting technology. In a paper published in Nature Photonics, UCSB electrical and computer engineering professor Jonathan Schuller and collaborators describe this new approach,
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IMAGE: Artificial red blood cells, like the one shown here, could carry oxygen, therapeutic drugs and other cargo in the bloodstream. Scale bar, 2 μm. view more  Credit: Adapted from ACS Nano 2020, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.9b08714 Scientists have tried to develop synthetic red blood cells that mimic the favorable properties of natural ones, such as flexibility, oxygen
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In March 1968, the fans, cast, and creators of the NBC-TV series Star Trek were celebrating an unprecedented victory: a massive mail campaign by fans of the show, which directed more than 100,000 letters (if not more) to NBC executives, had resulted in the network deciding not to cancel the sci-fi program after two seasons
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IMAGE: Angle-resolved ac magnetic susceptibility helps to understand the magnetic dynamics in single molecular magnets (SMMs). (Source: IFJ PAN) view more  Credit: Source: IFJ PAN Scientists from IFJ PAN in cooperation with researchers from the Nara Women’s University (Japan) and the Jagiellonian University (Poland) took another important step towards building a functional quantum computer. Using material
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IMAGE: Nanostructur porous titanium oxide thin film (TiOx) deposited on the plastic (PI: polyimide) substrate. view more  Credit: Osaka University Osaka, Japan – Many common household items and devices have a coating that improves performance. For example, the thin Teflon coating on cookware helps prevent food from sticking to the surface. However, it’s difficult to prepare–at
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Author: Grady Hendrix Publisher: Quirk Books Released: Out now Price: £9.99 When you hear “vampire slayer”, you probably think of a certain blonde teenager. But what the women of the Southern Book Club have in common with Buffy – aside from their bloodsucker problem – is that they’re living in the Nineties. In South Carolina
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IMAGE: A logo of the element ‘Au’ assembled by EPD method with gold nanoparticles. view more  Credit: Heyou Zhang Smart phones, tablets and laptop displays, camera lenses, biosensing devices, integrated chips and solar photovoltaic cells are among the applications that could stand to benefit from an innovative method of nanocrystal assembly pioneered by Australian scientists. Nanocrystals
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IMAGE: This illustration represents spin relaxation due to the coupling with lattice vibrations, as predicted from fully quantum-mechanical calculations. view more  Credit: Xinran Dongfang Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have developed a theoretical foundation and new computational tools for predicting a material’s spin dynamics, a key property for building solid-state quantum computing platforms and other applications
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The organisers of the excellent Arrow FrightFest have announced that due to the continuing COVID-19 restrictions on social distancing, its traditional five day event in August has been regretfully put on hold. Instead, they are planning to expand their traditional all-day Halloween event at the end of October. “Sadly, we won’t be able to come together
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Researchers from Monash University and the CSIRO have set a record for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) using technology that resembles a sponge filled with tiny magnets. Using a Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) nanocomposite that can be regenerated with remarkable speed and low energy cost, researchers have developed sponge-like technology that can capture carbon
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IMAGE: The black and white phase microscope image above helped UCI researchers identify where the squid reflectin protein nanostructures were present in human cells (dark regions, with some indicated by white… view more  Credit: Atouli Chatterjee / UC Irvine, Calif., June 2, 2020 — Octopuses, squids and other sea creatures can perform a disappearing act by
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IMAGE: Structure of stretchable color sheets and color change with stretching and contracting. view more  Credit: COPYRIGHT (C) TOYOHASHI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Overview A joint research team of Hayato Kumagai in the latter half of the doctoral course and Kazuhiro Takahashi, Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering of
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A mutation unique to certain cancer tumors is a potential homing beacon for safely deploying CRISPR gene editing enzymes to disarm DNA that makes cancer cells resistant to treatment, while ignoring the gene in normal cells where it’s critical to healthy function, according to a new study from ChristianaCare’s Gene Editing Institute in the journal
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HOUSTON – (June 2, 2020) – Boron nitride nanotubes are anything but boring, according to Rice University scientists who have found a way to watch how they move in liquids. The researchers’ method to study the real-time dynamics of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) allowed them to confirm, for the first time, that Brownian motion of
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The wait between Rick and Morty season 3 and season 4 took somewhere between forever and forever and a half. Or at least that’s what it felt like in the moment. In reality, the delay ended up being just over two full years. That’s a unit of time that “A Song of Ice and Fire”,
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IMAGE: Design concept of and fabrication procedures for the 3D scatterer view more  Credit: KAIST Researchers have developed a new easy-to-use smart optical film technology that allows smart window devices to autonomously switch between transparent and opaque states in response to the surrounding light conditions. The proposed 3D hybrid nanocomposite film with a highly periodic network
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IMAGE: The NUS research team behind the novel electronic material is led by Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee (centre). With him are two team members: Mr Wang Guanxiang (left), who is holding… view more  Credit: National University of Singapore Imagine a flexible digital screen that heals itself when it cracks, or a light-emitting robot that locates survivors
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This Roswell review contains spoilers. Roswell: Season 2 Episode 11 At a time when the world is rightly more focused on racial injustice than ever, television can feel either frivolous or like a much-needed escape. One thing for which I’ve always been grateful to Roswell is that it has never made viewers choose between valuing
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